It’s My Right.

If you live in the city or any busy town, especially in a developing country, some homes and buildings are auspiciously located beside construction sites that cause an infernal headache. I know tonnes of people(including my neighbours) who’ve given up with the sound of boxing and drilling throughout the evening. They’ve been yelling at the workers and even complaining to the landlords with all the noise. Talking, discussing and arguing is something happening everyday among everyone, usually with the person winning the argument or conflict having greater influence over the other person. But where did people get the right to talk and argue? Since when have people believed that they can talk and argue at any time? When I looked through a kid’s comic, ‘Lawtoons’ that taught kids about the importance of law, I got the answer to my questions.

Something which made the biggest change on the life of every human being, revolutionised countries and member states, and altered our relationship with people and physical object is law-the words of the constitution give us our rights to live the life we want to lead. India’s constitutional preamble declares it a sovereign, socialist, democratic republic, given each indian citizen the right to follow their own beliefs or ideas, have their say in politics, express themselves and say what feels right to them. The simplest of the actions and choices we have are all governed by law-from taking a shower to meeting a friend. The blog I’ve started and the books I read is a freedom granted to me, and I can’t imagine life for myself and others without these choices. The very creation of a country where human beings have their freedom, to be answerable for their own thoughts and actions itself makes our life as heavenly as it can get. But with law being an enormous advantage to citizens, there are some who are left out and whom don’t get to enjoy these privileges, like the army, navy or air force, who can’t take holidays or binge on the diet they wish for.
Unfortunately, not many notice the enormous importance of law and order in the country. Besides being a chapter included in civics textbooks across India, students look at law academically or something that doesn’t directly involve them. On India’s independence and republic day, few truly celebrate the spirit of India’s freedom and the brave conservatives, radical and revolutionary leaders who fought for India’s freedom. Nevertheless, international agencies like the UN are ensuring that people across the world are granted human rights, irrespective of their nation’s government system. Whether I’m in India or Japan, I do have the right to say and do as I wish(with certain restrictions of course) which ensures that I’m living an all-round life. In both countries, rights have been granted which ensures us to share our opinions and expressions through creation of poems, dramas, movies, drawings or simply a conversation, all of which make one country like another. It’s the quality of these expressions and the people which determine differences. Moreover on the extreme end of the spectrum, there are folks who live in ignorance: they don’t know these rights are granted to them, such as oppressed or developing nations like Pakistan, Bangladesh or iran. Their community or surroundings may have beliefs or traditions which each person has to follow- because of which people living in tiny villages or sparcely populated borders are not allowed to live up to their potential. If given the chance, they could be the next Steve Jobs or Melinda Gates.
Law enables us to control our own lives, and our fundamental duties encourage us to take these decisions positively. Today, on the 25th on July, Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam, one of India’s most famous and loved presidents has passed away. He was a man with a vision for a better India, achievable by the year 2020. Not just india, but the entire world can rise if every human being is aware of their right and knows how to take individual, positive decisions. Know the law. Know your right.